Posts by Yanick Champoux

Dist::Zilla autocomplete

Here are two little things I hacked on top of Dist::Zilla that peeps might find useful. The first, as hinted by the blog entry’s title, is a direct adaptation of Aristotle’s perldoc-complete for dzil. The second is actually the one that started that round of shaving for me. As there is about a gazillion Dist::Zilla plugins, I wanted to have a quick way to see all the plugins installed on a specific machine. Enter a new dzil sub-command: plugins.

Wherever I May Roam

Laziness and a severe addiction to yak shaving conspire to constantly make me tweak configurations and hack scripts to make my everyday editing / shell / development experience as holistic as possible. Unfortunately the same laziness, combined with my constant hopping between home and work computers, severely gets in the way of effectively using those optimizations. Indeed, although I have those nifty toys installed here and there, because they are not uniformly installed everywhere I constantly find myself using the machines’ functional lowest common denominator. To fix that, I’ve began to dump all my environment’s custom configurations, plugins, tweaks and hacks on Github. That way, I can import my whole baseline toolbox on any given box with a simple line….

Shuck & Awe #5: Hunting for Perl

First, Inigo Tejedor reminds us that we have until Thursday June 3rd (yes, tomorrow) to fill out the Perl programming survey. If you haven’t done so already, what are you waiting for? Stop reading this blog entry right now and go do your duty. No, seriously, go! And no peeking back until you’re done!

Shuck & Awe #4: Hunting for Perl

Curtis Jewell followed up on an old post by Adam Kennedy and checked out if shuffling things around really improve compression. From the results, there seems to be very little blood to be squeezed out of that stone. jjore came up with a very clever hack to stop the debugger when a test fails. Not only it is extremely useful, but the hack itself provides a lot of insight and food for thought for anyone attracted to the dark arts of under-the-Perl-interpreter-hood meddling.

Shuck & Awe #3: Hunting for Perl

Want to help Perl 6, and collect some booty in the process? Moritz Lenz has issued the first of a series of Perl 6 challenges. Fulfill the challenge, and get a chance to win mind-bogglingly fabulous prizes (well, okay, t-shirts for now). This week’s challenge doesn’t even require Perl 6 knowledge — it’s all about creating a website for proto.

Shuck & Awe #2: Hunting for Perl

Huzzah! It’s official, Perl 5.12 is out! If you haven’t already, check out the changelog! As one might expect, this little piece of news made its way on several blogs, both internal and external to the Perl community.

Shuck & Awe #1: Hunting for Perl

Welcome to the first issue of Shuck & Awe: Hunting for Perl. Inspired by Blogrotate and Log Buffer, I’ve decided to try jump-starting a bi-weekly review of everything and anything that caught our attention in the Perl world. Okay, that’s enough introduction. Let’s cut down to the meat already, and see what I’ve collected for the last two weeks.

dpanneur – your friendly DarkPAN/CPAN proxy corner store

There were two things I have wanted to do for some time now. The first was to come up with a way to quickly and easily set up a DarkPAN mirror so that we would have more control over our dependency chain at work. The second was to make a portable CPAN proxy service, so that I can always have access to my favorite modules, even if the machine I’m working on has no Internet access. Last week, I finally had a few ‘rount tuits’ to spend on this type of background itch, and the result is dpanneur (for dépanneur, French Canadian for convenience store). Here it is.

On the Perils of Importing Remote Tags in Git

One of the things I love about Git is how I can add branches from remote repositories in mine at will without fearing messing up anything. The remote branches will not clash with mine, even if they share the same names, because they are referenced as repository/branch. However, as for anything else, you can still poke yourself in the eye if you try hard enough…

cpanvote: A Perl Mini-Project

For many, CPAN is a Canadian Prairies-sized field of modules where it’s darn hard to separate the wheat from the chaff. While the CPAN Ratings service is the principal and official way CPAN tries to rank its distributions, for me at least, it doesn’t quite scratch the itch. Consequently, for a while now I’ve been playing with ideas on how the rating could be improved. What I came up with so far is a very minimal system going straight for the goods. And now, since I’ve had a three-day week, I decided to give the idea a try and implement a prototype.

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