Author: Paul Vallee

Good Luck at Collaborate ’06

Good luck to Pythian DBAs Christo Kutrosky and Babette Turner-Underwood who are presenting at Collaborate ’06 today and tomorrow. These are two outstanding presenters with deep technical knowledge reinforced with day-to-day use of the technology and I would encourage anyone to attend. If you attended the presentation, by all means post any feedback here!

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750G Disks are BAHD for DBs: A Call To Arms

I tripped across this story about some new 750G disks @ 7200 RPM soon to be released by Seagate. This filled me with a sense of dread about having to, once again, go through the process of convincing purchasing managers at various customer sites that actually, no, they can not just buy three of these and RAID-5 them together into a huge storage area for their terabyte database. So now, tell me, what happens when you use very big disks for high-performance applications? You have way, way too many square feet to service with far, far too few loading docks (and usually only one access road!!!).

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Oracle & Linux: Ancient History

Hearing this week that Larry Ellison is thinking of acquiring and releasing its own version of Linux and seeing the ensuing media buzz reminded me of a different, but no simpler time: November 9, 1998. In fact, to say it reminded me is an understatement, I have a severe case of déja vu!

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Inaugural post – Pythian and DBD::Oracle

I am happy to present the very first post to my new group blog, where I will be inviting Pythian DBAs with interesting thoughts to contribute to prepare blogs of their own. My subject for this first posting: DBD::Oracle. Pythian is a big user of perl and DBD::Oracle internally, as our problem tracking groupware, Support Track, and our availability monitoring software, avail, are all written using the DBI to communicate with the underlying database.
Seah Hull at the Oracle Open Source blog interviewed me on the subject of Pythian taking on the stewardship of DBD::Oracle and even has a podcast of the interview available on his site.

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Computer Associates Spins Ingres to Garnett & Helfrich

Computer Associates has sold its Ingres database to a private equity firm, Garnett & Helfrich Capital. The new owners of the database have reaffirmed their commitment to making Ingres open source, and are planning to earn revenue from support contracts and other related services.

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Open Source DBMS Vendors Pour Cold Water on Oracle Express

Oracle announced that it would release a free for production use version of its database product, limited to 4G in the database, 1G of ram and a single CPU. Today, the four major open source DBMS vendors (MySQL, Postgres, Firebird, and Sleepycat) unanimously rejected Oracle’s new free-to-use Express Edition beta, claiming that users will not accept the capacity limits of the new oracle product.

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MySQL 5.0 is Now Available

MySQL AB,”developer of the world’s most popular open source database” has released today, the production versionof MySQL 5.0, its most important upgrade in ten years. The 5.0 version provides new enterprise database features such as stored procedures, triggers, views and cursors.

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Oracle Issues its Quarterly (Oct/2005) Critical Patch Update

Oracle has now issued its latest quarterly security patch (Oct/2005) which is geared at packaging several security issues into one very large patch, thus making it easier for customers to keep track of where they are with respect to having their Oracle products secured.

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Siebel Customers to Choose Between Oracle and SAP

Oracle, currently in the process of acquiring the leading CRM (“Customer Relationship Management”) vendor, Siebel, is seeing some form of competition from SAP, who is offering to US companies running Siebel, a credit of up to 75% of their existing Siebel software licensing fees toward the licensing of SAP’s comparable CRM products.

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Microsoft Announces Vitual Processor Licensing Strategy

Microsoft has introduced a new licensing policy, allowing CPU-restricted virtual machines to be created, and software to be licensed based on the CPU’s assigned to the virtual machine. This allows software licenses to be sold based on CPU’s actually in use rather than number of CPU’s physically present.

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