Posts Categorized: Pythian

750G Disks are BAHD for DBs: A Call To Arms

I tripped across this story about some new 750G disks @ 7200 RPM soon to be released by Seagate. This filled me with a sense of dread about having to, once again, go through the process of convincing purchasing managers at various customer sites that actually, no, they can not just buy three of these and RAID-5 them together into a huge storage area for their terabyte database. So now, tell me, what happens when you use very big disks for high-performance applications? You have way, way too many square feet to service with far, far too few loading docks (and usually only one access road!!!).

AMD’s “reverse multi-threading”, RAID for the CPU?

I read an article about combining multiple CPU’s and presenting them to the OS as a singe CPU. That way all applications that are currently designed to run only on a single CPU will be able to benefit from multiple CPUs. The problem is, I don’t see how this can be achieved. CPUs already have multiple pipelines, out of order executions etc. Some instructions just have to be executed in sequence and cannot be parallelized. If this technology is implemented in a similar way to hard disk RAID, then I wonder how would that affect application behavior?

Oracle & Linux: Ancient History

Hearing this week that Larry Ellison is thinking of acquiring and releasing its own version of Linux and seeing the ensuing media buzz reminded me of a different, but no simpler time: November 9, 1998. In fact, to say it reminded me is an understatement, I have a severe case of déja vu!

Quantifying Commit Time

Have you ever wondered how fast you can commit ? No matter what you do, a true commit will take time. The time will be very small, but it will still be more then doing an in memory query of a lookup table. And worst of all, you will serialize at the entire instance on it. So I did a test on how fast you can commit with 1 session. This will be the absolute maximum you can achieve in commit performance.

Traceless DB Time Diagnosis

Here’s a quick way to diagnose where the database is spending its time for a specific process/operation. This is very similar to what statspack is doing, except it’s targeted towards a specific process, and does include the time where the database waited for the application.

Inaugural post – Pythian and DBD::Oracle

I am happy to present the very first post to my new group blog, where I will be inviting Pythian DBAs with interesting thoughts to contribute to prepare blogs of their own. My subject for this first posting: DBD::Oracle. Pythian is a big user of perl and DBD::Oracle internally, as our problem tracking groupware, Support Track, and our availability monitoring software, avail, are all written using the DBI to communicate with the underlying database.
Seah Hull at the Oracle Open Source blog interviewed me on the subject of Pythian taking on the stewardship of DBD::Oracle and even has a podcast of the interview available on his site.

Pythian Celebrates Re-implemention of Industry News

Pythian News is now using WordPress to transform our Industry News section into a group blog of articles relevant to the DBA community at large. We hope this will allow readers from throughout the DBA industry to get involved and not only view our blogs, but also be able to contribute to the discussions.

BEA Succumbs to Multi-Core Pricing Pressure

BEA finally gave up on their multi-core pricing formula of charging a 25% premium for dual-core CPUs. Oracle is still holding out with their “every core is .75 CPUs and we’re rounding up” pricing model. Interestingly, The Register isn’t shy about coming right out and saying what most of us have been thinking for some time: “Oracle has become somewhat of a multicore pricing laughingstock”. Link to article.

Pleasanton Surviving Oracle’s Takeover of Peoplesoft

When Oracle took over Peoplesoft earlier this year, there was much doom and gloom in PropleSoft’s home town of Pleasanton, California because Peoplesoft employed 3000 people out of the total population of around 60000. It turns out that the end result has not been all bad for Pleasanton, other high-tech companies are moving in, taking advantage of the highly skilled workforce that Oracle laid off in its quest for acquisition-related efficiency and the overall impact on the community of the merger has been mild at worst.

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