Log Buffer #111: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Posted in: Technical Track

Crisis has struck! This week’s Log Buffer editor had to beg off at the eleventh hour when his time vanished. It happens. But, in every crisis, an opportunity (well . . .  maybe, maybe not). The opportunity — an open discussion of this week’s best database blog articles. Readers in control.

Log Buffer is always looking for editors, so if you’d like to step forward and publish one on your own blog, read the Log Buffer guidelines and send me an email.

I’m going to go through my bookmarks and add my own presently. I hope to hear from you!

Interested in working with David? Schedule a tech call.

About the Author

Dave Edwards is the Communications Specialist for the Pythian Group.

6 Comments. Leave new

For my money one of the best recent articles has been Keith Murphy’s rundown of the qualities of a good DBA (http://www.pythian.com/blogs/1169/what-makes-a-good-dba ). As I transition into a more formalized DBA role myself, it is good to see the things I am working on, be it hammering out our backup and recovery process or just reading documentation and books to further my own knowledge put out there by someone more experienced than I as the right things to do.

It didn’t spawn a lot of discussion, maybe because it is mostly common sense stuff, but still worth a read, especially for a newbie to the field.

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Thanks Joe. (I didn’t put him up to it, I swear!)

Here are a couple from me.

Stefan Esser on MySQL and SQL Column Truncation Vulnerabilities. Also covered in the SiteCrafting Blog’s item on MySQL Login Truncation.

Mats Kindahl investigated Drizzle and Google’s protobuf tool (“…a way of encoding structured data in an efficient yet extensible format. Google uses Protocol Buffers for almost all of its internal RPC protocols and file formats.”)

John Russell
looked at How PL/SQL Could Be More Like Python. Python happens to be my favourite language.

I’ve been leaning on Steve Karam’s Ace, DBA comics lately, so why stop now? This one is called Large Query Collider.

SQLDenis and his readers discussed how, Only In A Database Can You Get 1000% + Improvement By Changing A Few Lines Of Code.

On SQLBlogs, Joe Chang had a much-appreciated post on Large Query Performance from SQL Server 2000 to 2008, 32 & 64-bit.

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I promise that we did not have a secret alliance by which I praised a Pythian blog and then David tossed a SiteCrafting blog into his list in return. Really.

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This isn’t a new one, but I just found it this week and thought it was helpful–and news to me. It is about applying an inc backup to a physical standby database by Jason Arneil.

I also liked Paul’s post on Outsourcing vs. Offshoring…an interesting view into the business side of making magic happen.

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Most of these are coming off my google reader shared items which can be found here if you want more:
http://www.google.com/reader/shared/09956560379006770135

Buck Woody throws out some testing #’s for SQL Server 2008
http://blogs.msdn.com/buckwoody/archive/2008/08/21/katmai-test-statistics.aspx

Aaron B. talks about his SQL Server vNext wishlist:
http://sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2008/08/20/my-current-tools-wishlist-for-sql-server-2011.aspx

Paul Randal gives another reason that clustering on a guid is a bad idea.
http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/2008/08/20/CanGUIDClusterKeysCauseNonclusteredIndexFragmentation.aspx

I put together a list of SQL People I follow on twitter. Doh, I forgot Paul!
http://statisticsio.com/Home/tabid/36/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/217/Cool-SQL-People-that-I-Follow-on-Twitter.aspx

Brent Ozar talk about SQL and P2V
http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2008/08/sql-p2v-what-really-killed-the-dinosaurs/

He also has a nice post on shared vs. dedicated lun’s.
http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2008/08/sql-server-on-a-san-dedicated-or-shared-drives/

Oh and I do some filtered index vs. indexed view tests.
http://statisticsio.com/Home/tabid/36/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/219/Filtered-Indexes-VS-Indexed-Views.aspx

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Thanks Jason and Dan, those are excellent!

@Joe: It’s true, you and I have no quid pro quo. In fact, your blog is fairly new to me, and I added it to my comment without even knowing it was yours.

I’ve added a little formatting to these comments — I figured that if you’re contributing, I can at least pretty up your comments as I did my own.

Keep ’em coming, and I’ll keep prettying and publishing them.

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