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Recent Changes to Oracle SE Licensing Rules: Higher Price?

I came across what appeared to be a change to the rules for licensing Oracle Standard Edition — a change that appears to be subtle on the surface, but one that could have significant and surprising repercussions.Mistake or not, though, there is a clear moral to this story. You need to read the license agreement, even when you are only planning a purchase. Trust me — reading the license after the P.O.s have been cut will not make you look good in a situation like this. And not reading the license would be a major mistake indeed!

Fedora 9’s Broken Install

Fedora 9 was released on the 13th. I waited a whole three days to make sure I wasn’t going to be the beta-tester. Then I tried out the live release, and finally decided to upgrade my main workstation to Fedora 9 today. To be sure I wouldn’t mess stuff up, I used the DVD installer to upgrade. The upgrade finished fine, but when I rebooted, XChat would not run. Readers — any similar experiences or advice?

Oracle RAC and gv$ Views: A Second Look

I decided to reprise my commentary on Oracle RAC and the gv$ views after reading Patrick’s comments on my previous post. It is always encouraging to know that someone is kind enough to read your work and provide insightful feedback – many thanks to him! There are two questions that I wanted to answer here: Can you use the gv$ views with a non-RAC environment? What do the WHERE clauses in a good block-checking script do?

Debian OpenSSL Package Introduces Vulnerability

The highlight today of probably every Linux-related mailing list and IRC channel was the announcement of CVE-2008-0166, affecting OpenSSL libraries on Debian-based Linux distributions, including the popular Ubuntu. The vulnerability has been present since September of 2006, and Debian strongly suggests throwing your old keys out completely.

Oracle 11G Result Cache in the Real World

As some of you probably already noticed, there was a thread on AskTom discussing the scalability tests I did back in 2007. You are welcome to read the entire thread, but in a nutshell, Tom Kyte claimed that my tests did not reflect how one would use the result cache in the real world. What is “real world?”

The Architecture Layer

Contemporary software engineering models include many loosely-defined layers. Database developers might help with other layers, but for the most part a database administrator’s domain is the persistence layer. The Daily WTF has an article on The Mythical Business Layer makes the case for not separating the business layer and the application layer: I will call this merged business/application layer the “functional layer.” The serious scaling requirements posed by most applications these days call for partitioning, clustering, sharding or some other term for “dividing up the data so it does not become the bottleneck”. Enter the “architecture layer”. I hear you asking. “Isn’t that just the persistence layer?” Yes and no.

What’s New in 11i TXK AutoConfig and Templates Rollup Patch S

The 11i TXK AutoConfig and Templates Rollup Patch S (6372396) was released on May 5th. This patch differs from traditional TXK autoconfig template patch releases in that the ATG team decided to include some other important TXK patches also with this release. One of these is TXK Advanced Utilities Rollup Patch C (5011249). As a side effect of this generous inclusion of import updates, the patch size has increased from 16mb (RUP R) to 65mb (RUP S).

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