Tag: DBA Lounge

Know your my.cnf groups, part II

Ronald Bradford’s recent warning to be sure to know your my.cnf sections reminded me of a similar issue that I ran into last summer, where putting the “group” option in both the [mysqld_safe] and [mysqld] directives resulted in a mostly silent problem. I started noticing this in MySQL 5.1 and it affected both the official MySQL binary and the Percona binary. In trying to be conscientious, I had the following set..

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Local POD browsing: using Pod::POM::Web via the CLI

Half the time I want to peek at the doc of a module, I hit perldoc. The rest of the time I type cpan Some::Module[1] in Firefox and read the POD straight out of CPAN. And while it’s pretty and handy, it also feels kinda silly to go on a remote server to read documentation that is also sitting on my computer. Surely, I tell myself, there must be a better way. And here it is.

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Book Review of Guy Harrison’s Oracle Performance Survival Guide

This is the first time I have read one of Guy’s books and I was very impressed at the breadth of topics that are addressed and especially the approach that is followed starting from the application design rather than trying to find the elusive fast=true setting that resolves every problem.

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GPL/ASL/BSD License Misconceptions and MySQL

Having been a free software user and supporter for many years, I am disheartened by some of the comments made in the MySQL/Oracle debate regarding the GNU Public License (GPL) and other licenses. There is much throwing around of misconceptions and untruths about licenses and their differences. In this blog, I shall take on some of the bigger misconceptions.

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More Fun with Perl and Inline IFs

My old arch-nemesis, the in-line if ($q = $q == $a ? $b : $c;) reared its ugly little head again. This time, it was in context of an web page that displayed some form values. Here’s what I did.

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PostgreSQL Administrator’s Cheatsheet

Most people start with free databases and eventually get to know the enterprise products. I started the other way around. After being trapped for eight years in the Oracle world, I felt like exploring another database platform. For some reason I can’t get myself to fiddle around with MySQL. There’s nothing rational about this–no benchmarks, reviews, or co-worker horror stories. I feel it’s just not my type. So when looking for free database, I reached out for PostgreSQL, again for no objective reason–only the gut feeling that this could be what I’m looking for.

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Oracle Streams Apply Process changes in 11GR2

It is somewhat timely that we’ve been doing some Oracle Golden Gate testing which in turn made me curious to take a closer look at Oracle Streams in 11GR2 and see where all the performance is coming from. I’ve setup a simple replication for table t1 from schema src to schema dst, changed Apply Server parallelism to 1 and did a simple test with inserting 100 rows while performing a sql trace. Let’s get started.

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Oracle 11.2 Silent Installation on OpenSolaris

When Oracle announced Oracle 11.2 for Solaris (x86-64), I decided to try a silent installation of Oracle on OpenSolaris, even though it is not certified. I downloaded the Solaris ISO and installed it as 64-bit on one of my virtual machines without a problem, I was soon enjoying OpenSolaris. I eventually stopped admiring the good-looking interface and connected through a plain old black-and-white ssh terminal to execute the silent installation. Based on the silent installation that I had earlier executed on Linux for 11.2, I started the following…

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Today’s Perl Lesson

One thing I find fascinating in Perl is that I am always seeing new ways to perform the same mundane task. Today I had to output some tabular data, so I thought it would be nice if I alternated colors for each row. Easy enough in Perl—just create a hash with your colours as the value and then the swapping variable as the key, like this…

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C.J. Date’s Seminar Not to Miss in January 2010

I’ve recently learned that Chris Date is giving a three days seminar. It must be one of the unique opportunities to learn from the world renown expert in relational database theory. The seminar title is “How to Write Correct SQL and Know It: A Relational Approach to SQL”. It’s focused on writing reliable SQL. While SQL has been designed as a simple access interface to relational data, it turned out to be quite complex and requires your to follow a certain disciplines to produce truly reliable SQL code — relational discipline.

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