Tag: MySQL

MySQL Query Analyzer Review

I had the chance to review the new Query Analyzer program from Sun over the last few days. I am very interested in how it performs as I have previously not had a chance to see the program in action (or the Enterprise Monitor program either for that matter). So, before getting into what the Query Analyzer can (and cannot) do let’s look at what Sun says it does.

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Log Buffer #133: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Hello and welcome to the 133rd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

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MySQL: Using CONNECT to Quickly Verify Replication Health

One very helpful use of the technique Sheeri described in Remote connections without leaving the mysql shell is making sure that replication is working properly. According to the MySQL Reference Manual’s section on SHOW SLAVE STATUS Syntax, it shows information corresponding to the slave thread in the slave server. When replication is broken, however, or not working properly due to network issues between master and slave, this information may not be accurate. This has improved over recent releases, but it’s still not perfect. The question, then, is: how to be 100% sure (or as close as you can get to 100%) that replication is running fine? The answer, as offered by Sheeri: use CONNECT.

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MySQL Memory Consumption

Sure, there are some big things. innodb_buffer_pool_size and key_buffer_size spring to mind. But all the little things add up too. On a busy system did you consider thread_stack? It defaults to 128k per connection. With 500 connections that’s 64 MB. You may dismiss that and and say its not much. But in the end it doesn’t take 64 MB to cause a crash of your serve.

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Log Buffer #132: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

The 132nd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs, has been published by Lisa Dobson on the Oracle Newbies Blog.

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Hitting Oracle with a Hammer

Recently, I had an opportunity to participate in a database stress-testing exercise. The objective is to make sure the particular hardware can handle the expected load and also to test where the physical limit of the machine lies if we keep increasing the number of concurrent users. I searched for tools available out there. The open source Hammerora turned out to be excellent tool for the purpose of simulating a typical transactions load in any number of threads. It’s built with the Tcl scripting language and it can simulate a real workload with as many client user sessions as your system can handle. If you’re looking for an easy way to measure throughput performance of your database, keep reading.

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MySQL Back to Basics: Lesser-known MySQL client scripts

So there’s a whole bunch of MySQL scripts included with any release, who can say they know them all? In this blog post, we will take a look at some of these and show usage examples that may help you in your environment.

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Log Buffer #131: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Welcome to the 131st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

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Refactoring MySQL Applications: Part 1

Let me welcome you to this series on refactoring MySQL applications. I will cover best practices and useful tips, as well as show working examples of potential loopholes and solutions. Let’s start by saying that there are other ways to reach performance, but in some cases refactoring may be the only way that is possible to pursue, for one reason or another. Let’s take the refactoring way, focusing on SQL rather than applications, as there’s a lot that can be done on this side.

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Pythian adds another Certified MySQL Cluster DBA

The Pythian Group added another feather to its cap today. Our Nicklas Westerlund passed his MySQL Cluster DBA Certification exam, making him part of an elite group of 57 MySQL Cluster Certified DBAs worldwide, and now two here at Pythian, the other being Augusto Bott.

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