Tag: Oracle

MySQL plug-in 1.1 for Oracle 10g Grid Control

It’s been a while since the MySQL Management Plug-in 0.42 was released. Since then, I quietly updated it to version 1.0. The changes were very few; the biggest news was that the plug-in was certified by Oracle and added to OTN Oracle 10g Grid Control Extensions Exchange. Version 1.1 turned out to be a major rewrite for the Perl collection scripts and the net result is that compatibility across platforms is greatly improved. I have successfully tested the new version on Linux and Windows Agent hosts. So what’s new in version 1.1 compared to 0.42? Find out here.

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Log Buffer #101: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Welcome the the 101st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

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Get to Know the 11i Context File Better

From my previous post on TXK rollup patch, you already know the significance of adctxinf.tmp file in $AD_TOP/admin/template directory. It has wealth of information about different XML tags in the Context XML file of an Apps 11i instance. In relation to the same file, now I want to share with you all a small XSL (XML style sheet) file I wrote back in 2005. It makes adctxinf.tmp much more readable; all tags are presented in a tabular format in the browser.

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FLASHBACK TABLE vs. DBA_OBJECTS . LAST_DDL_TIME

It turns out that there are a few statements that will update the LAST_DDL_TIME without changing the table structure. An item to note is that a prerequisite to FLASHBACK TABLE is to enable row movement on that table, via (you guessed it) an ALTER TABLE statement. The ALTER TABLE foo ENABLE ROW MOVEMENT statement also bumps LAST_DDL_TIME, but obviously doesn’t block FLASHBACK TABLE from going past it in time.
The bottom of all this is that you can’t use LAST_DDL_TIME to determine just how far back you can go with a FLASHBACK TABLE statement, as you can most likely go past it due to various non-structure-changing DDL statements that affect that timestamp. Here’s a little demonstration to illustrate this point

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Oracle Silent Mode, Part 1: Installation Of 10.2 And 11.1 Databases

This post is the first of a series of ten posts that will explore some of the Oracle Universal Installer (OUI), Network Assistant (NETCA), Database Creation Assistant (DBCA), Database Upgrade Assistant (DBUA), and many more syntaxes you can use to script or speed up Oracle Installations. Let’s start with covering the Installation of 10.2 And 11.1 Databases.

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Log Buffer #100: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs, is 100 editions (and almost two-years) old today! Lewis Cunningham has returned to LB to publish The Big 100th edition of LB on An Expert’s Guide to Oracle Technology.

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Date Dimension vs. Function-Based Indexes: Is the Date Dimension Still Relevant?

The purpose of this post is to verify if a date dimension is better in regards to performance and functionality than a series of function-based indexes on a date column in the fact table.

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Oracle Open World 2008 Sessions — Vote on Oracle Mix

I just wanted to make a quick note that Oracle Mix organized an interesting hybrid between call for papers and abstract judging. Anyone registered at Oracle Mix can propose a session abstract to present themselves or as an idea for others. Everyone can give their votes to the proposed sessions. At the end of the voting deadline (25th of June) Oracle will select the top sessions to be included in the Oracle Open World schedule.

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Log Buffer #99: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Welcome the the 99th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

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Stabilize Oracle Bind Peeking Behaviour with Range-Based Predicates

In my previous post, I described the most common cause for unstable plans due to bind peeking — histograms. It is now time to move forward and take a look at another case, namely range-based predicates. Strictly speaking, the cases I’m going to describe can appear without range-based predicates as well, you just need to remember that a range-based operation doesn’t necessarily imply a range-based predicate.

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